ludimagister

28, male. columbus, oh.

Despite all the intellectual posturing, we’re nothing but biological machines designed by evolution to strive for our genetic survival. All our noble pursuits end up being nothing more than second-order strivings for sexual access and social status.

“That Man is the product of causes which had no prevision of the end they were achieving; that his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; that no fire, no heroism, no intensity of thought and feeling can preserve an individual life beyond the grave; that all the labours of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the débris of a universe in ruins—all these things, if not quite beyond dispute, are yet so nearly certain that no philosophy which rejects them can hope to stand. Only within the scaffolding of these truths, only on the firm foundation of unyielding despair can the soul’s habitation henceforth be safely built.”

—   Bertrand Russell, A Free Man’s Worship

“And what is the most terrible thing about boredom? Why do we rush to dispel it? Because it is a distraction-free state which soon enough reveals underlying unpalatable truths about existence—our insignificance, our meaningless existence, our inexorable progression to deterioration and death.”

—   The Schopenhauer Cure , Irvin Yalom (via itsonlypretendingtobeachandelier)

(via anahrona)

Sam Harris’ recent post on Israeli-Palestinian conflict demonstrates that even the most intelligent amongst us can blunder tremendously when stuck within a singular perspective. You cannot make a political analysis based on theological makeup of these populations without having an iota of understanding about the underlying power dynamics that are being transformed rapidly throughout the entire middle east. The theological rhetoric used by the established powers to gain moral high ground within their own support bases amounts to little more than a mere epiphenomena over the real power struggle. Moreover, even if theological differences were to have the force to escalate such events, as he seems to believe, the actions he thinks Israel is justified in carrying out achieve nothing more than further spreading those problematic memes throughout the Palestinian population, as this is how those theological memes are designed to operate within any given population. Perhaps he thinks that humans do have contra-causal free will after all—to transcend their circumstances, to see things sub specie aeternitatis, and to act in ways that completely override the memes that operate within their psyches.

90schild:

I think about this every time I watch a superhero movie….

(via prayforoptimists)

We, humans, receive sensory expressions, extract evidence from them, form and refine our beliefs, and then use our beliefs in simulating scenarios and regulating our behaviors. So, what then is a belief? A way of compressing information. Born out of practical necessities, not of epistemic ones. Storing the entirety of our sensory expressions throughout our lives and processing the entire archive at any given moment in order to regulate our behavior was infeasible because of the computational and storage limitations of our limited brains; so evolution invented “belief.” Beliefs, thus, are not to be evaluated in relation to “truth,” but in relation to what information they contain and what prediction they can make.

It’s a nice day.

It is not you, tumblr. It is me.

“Live. Be great and unhappy.”

—    Giacomo Leopardi, Dialogue between Nature and a Soul

(Source: ludimagister)

“Nothing is funnier than unhappiness, I grant you that.”

—   Samuel Beckett

(Source: ludimagister)

“The seed of a metaphysical defeat is in all of us. For the honest questioner, who doesn’t seek refuge in some faith or fantasy, there will never be an answer.”

—   Peter Wessel Zapffe, To Be a Human Being

(Source: ludimagister)

“Each new generation asks: “What is the meaning of life?” A more fertile way of putting the question would be: “Why does man need a meaning to life?””

—   Peter Wessel Zapffe, To Be a Human Being

(Source: ludimagister)

What a lovely afternoon.

“By imitating virtue we become virtuous.”

—   André Comte-Sponville, A Small Treatise on the Great Virtues: The Uses of Philosophy in Everyday Life